Meissen chocolate cup, circa 1715

Meissen chocolate cup, circa 1715
Meissen Bottger porcelain chocolate cup, circa 1715

Meissen Böttger porcelain chocolate cup, circa 1715

From our upcoming exhibition comes this superb piece of early Meissen porcelain. Belonging to the Böttger period, it represents the pioneering days of porcelain production in Europe. Böttger was the alchemist who stumbled across the formula for true porcelain, in Dresden in 1709. The first commercial products appeared in 1710, and this piece dates to circa 1715 – almost as early as you can go with European porcelain.

Meissen Bötger porcelain with  Seuter decoration.

Meissen Bötger porcelain with Seuter decoration.

This superb piece shows hardly a sign of wear to the rather vulnerable gold. Such decoration originates in the Augsburg studio of the Seuter brothers – there were four brothers, who as goldsmiths, painters and silk dyers were very much able to create luxury products for the wealthy. When the new medium of porcelain emerged from Meissen, they soon perfected the skill of gilding the white wares from the factory, adding burnished details such as faces and clothes using a polished stone, after the gold was lightly fired on.

We’re delighted to have this piece as a part of our 2014 Exhibition of Recent Acquisitions.

This exhibition features over 500 fresh items, and will take place at our Geelong gallery on Saturday April the 12th.

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